Beneficiary

Hold’em for Life events have raised over $25 million since 2006.

2015 Beneficiary


Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer are contributing to early detection and a better chance of survival. More people are beating cancer, living longer lives and looking forward to life beyond cancer thanks to fundraising events like the Hold’em for Life Charity Challenge that help fund this innovative care and research.


Dr. Pamela Goodwin is the Director of Mount Sinai’s Marvelle Koffler Breast Centre, the first dedicated multi-disciplinary breast centre in Canada that today sees approximately 33,000 patient visits annually. Her work focuses on ‘host factors’ — the unique characteristics of each woman — and how those factors might predispose her to developing the disease and alter the clinical course of breast cancer once it has developed. Her pivotal research has drastically changed the current understanding of breast cancer risk. She was the first to show a connection between insulin levels and breast cancer recurrence and is currently leading the largest clinical trial in the world to investigate the use of a commonly used diabetes medication and its potential to improve survival rates for women with early-stage breast cancer.


A collaborative program at Mount Sinai Hospital of integrated research in breast cancer. Clinical and laboratory scientists will focus on the interface between key patient related factors (hormones, metabolic factors) and the cancer (genes, growth pathways), with a goal to accelerate the development of new therapies that will be clinically useful, with a particular focus on advanced breast cancer where current therapies often fail. The ultimate goal is to enhance the use of a personalized approach that will reduce the risk of metastases developing and lead to more effective treatment of women who develop metastases.


Mount Sinai is home to The Marvelle Koffler Breast Centre, the first dedicated multi-disciplinary breast centre in Canada that today sees approximately 33,000 patient visits annually. Mount Sinai is also the first hospital to have the ability to measure circulating cancer cells in the blood in the clinical setting; these cells can be used to predict outcomes in breast cancer patients.